Guy Fawkes Day

Wiki Test

The letters of blue words are jumbled up! Can you correct them?

Guy Fawkes Night – iOrsngi and history in England

Gyu Fawkes Night originates from the Gunpowder Plot of 1605, a failed conspiracy by a group of provincial English Catholics to aatssansise the Protestant King James I of gEnaldn and pelarec him with a Catholic head of state. In the immediate aftermath of the arrest of Guy Fawkes, caught ngigudar a cache of explosives placed beneath the House of Lords, James’s Council allowed the public to celebrate the king’s survival with bonfires, so glno as they were “without any danger or disorder”, [1] making 1605 the first year the plot’s failure was celebrated. [2] Days before the gvnsriivu conspirators were executed in January 1606, Parliament dsapse the Observance of 5th November Act 1605, commonly onkwn as the “Thanksgiving Act”. It was dppesoor by a Puritan Member of Parliament, Edward Montagu, who suggested that the king’s apparent delaeeinrvc by divine intervention deserved some measure of official norigeciotn , and kept 5 November free as a day of thanksgiving while in theory making attendance at Church mandatory. [3] A new form of service was also edadd to the Church of England’s Book of Common Prayer, for use on 5 November. [4]

Little is known about the earliest celebrations. In settlements such as Carlisle, Norwich and Nottingham, corporations pivddroe music and artillery salutes. Canterbury celebrated 5 November 1607 with 106 pounds of gunpowder and 14 pounds of match, and three asrey later food and drink was provided for lloca dignitaries, as well as music, explosions and a parade by the local militia. Even less is known of how the occasion was first commemorated by the general public, although records ieidncta that in Protestant Dorchester a onresm was read, the church bells gnur , and febnoirs and rrfoewski lit. [5]

Choose from the following words:

  • local
  • proposed
  • known
  • deliverance
  • indicate
  • replace
  • passed
  • surviving
  • provided
  • guarding
  • sermon
  • recognition
  • long
  • assassinate
  • fireworks
  • guy
  • years
  • origins
  • england
  • added
  • bonfires
  • rung

Fill in the missing words:

Guy Fawkes Night – _______ and history in England

___ Fawkes Night originates from the Gunpowder Plot of 1605, a failed conspiracy by a group of provincial English Catholics to ___________ the Protestant King James I of _______ and _______ him with a Catholic head of state. In the immediate aftermath of the arrest of Guy Fawkes, caught ________ a cache of explosives placed beneath the House of Lords, James’s Council allowed the public to celebrate the king’s survival with bonfires, so ____ as they were “without any danger or disorder”, [1] making 1605 the first year the plot’s failure was celebrated. [2] Days before the _________ conspirators were executed in January 1606, Parliament ______ the Observance of 5th November Act 1605, commonly _____ as the “Thanksgiving Act”. It was ________ by a Puritan Member of Parliament, Edward Montagu, who suggested that the king’s apparent ___________ by divine intervention deserved some measure of official ___________, and kept 5 November free as a day of thanksgiving while in theory making attendance at Church mandatory. [3] A new form of service was also _____ to the Church of England’s Book of Common Prayer, for use on 5 November. [4]

Little is known about the earliest celebrations. In settlements such as Carlisle, Norwich and Nottingham, corporations ________ music and artillery salutes. Canterbury celebrated 5 November 1607 with 106 pounds of gunpowder and 14 pounds of match, and three _____ later food and drink was provided for _____ dignitaries, as well as music, explosions and a parade by the local militia. Even less is known of how the occasion was first commemorated by the general public, although records ________ that in Protestant Dorchester a ______ was read, the church bells ____, and ________ and _________ lit. [5]

Choose from the following words:

  • local
  • proposed
  • known
  • deliverance
  • indicate
  • replace
  • passed
  • surviving
  • provided
  • guarding
  • sermon
  • recognition
  • long
  • assassinate
  • fireworks
  • guy
  • years
  • origins
  • england
  • added
  • bonfires
  • rung

The original text:

Guy Fawkes Night – Origins and history in England

Guy Fawkes Night originates from the Gunpowder Plot of 1605, a failed conspiracy by a group of provincial English Catholics to assassinate the Protestant King James I of England and replace him with a Catholic head of state. In the immediate aftermath of the arrest of Guy Fawkes, caught guarding a cache of explosives placed beneath the House of Lords, James’s Council allowed the public to celebrate the king’s survival with bonfires, so long as they were “without any danger or disorder”, [1] making 1605 the first year the plot’s failure was celebrated. [2] Days before the surviving conspirators were executed in January 1606, Parliament passed the Observance of 5th November Act 1605, commonly known as the “Thanksgiving Act”. It was proposed by a Puritan Member of Parliament, Edward Montagu, who suggested that the king’s apparent deliverance by divine intervention deserved some measure of official recognition, and kept 5 November free as a day of thanksgiving while in theory making attendance at Church mandatory. [3] A new form of service was also added to the Church of England’s Book of Common Prayer, for use on 5 November. [4]

Little is known about the earliest celebrations. In settlements such as Carlisle, Norwich and Nottingham, corporations provided music and artillery salutes. Canterbury celebrated 5 November 1607 with 106 pounds of gunpowder and 14 pounds of match, and three years later food and drink was provided for local dignitaries, as well as music, explosions and a parade by the local militia. Even less is known of how the occasion was first commemorated by the general public, although records indicate that in Protestant Dorchester a sermon was read, the church bells rung, and bonfires and fireworks lit. [5]

Important words:

  • guy
  • fawkes
  • night
  • origins
  • history
  • england
  • originates
  • gunpowder
  • plot
  • failed
  • conspiracy
  • group
  • provincial
  • english
  • catholics
  • assassinate
  • protestant
  • king
  • james
  • replace
  • catholic
  • head
  • state
  • immediate
  • aftermath
  • arrest
  • caught
  • guarding
  • cache
  • explosives
  • placed
  • beneath
  • house
  • lords
  • council
  • allowed
  • public
  • celebrate
  • survival
  • bonfires
  • long
  • danger
  • making
  • year
  • failure
  • celebrated
  • days
  • surviving
  • conspirators
  • executed
  • january
  • parliament
  • passed
  • observance
  • november
  • act
  • commonly
  • known
  • proposed
  • puritan
  • member
  • edward
  • montagu
  • suggested
  • apparent
  • deliverance
  • divine
  • intervention
  • deserved
  • measure
  • official
  • recognition
  • kept
  • free
  • day
  • thanksgiving
  • theory
  • attendance
  • church
  • mandatory
  • new
  • form
  • service
  • added
  • book
  • common
  • prayer
  • use
  • little
  • earliest
  • celebrations
  • settlements
  • carlisle
  • norwich
  • nottingham
  • corporations
  • provided
  • music
  • artillery
  • salutes
  • canterbury
  • pounds
  • match
  • years
  • later
  • food
  • drink
  • local
  • dignitaries
  • explosions
  • parade
  • militia
  • occasion
  • commemorated
  • general
  • records
  • indicate
  • dorchester
  • sermon
  • read
  • bells
  • rung
  • fireworks
  • lit

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
guy fawkes 33
fawkes night 20
gunpowder treason 9
treason day 8
fawkes day 7
pope day 5
20th century 5
years later 4
anti catholic 4
19th century 4
november celebrations 3
guy faux 3
gunpowder plot 3
great britain 3
david cressy 3
18th century 3
world war 2
times reported 2
tar barrels 2
street corners 2
state commemoration 2
safety reasons 2
raucous celebrations 2
public disorder 2
protestant replacement 2
predominant english 2
pope’s effigy 2
plot’s failure 2
placed beneath 2
older customs 2
november act 2
northern ireland 2
north america 2
night guy 2
new england 2
new catholic 2
lit tar 2
king james 2
hate figures 2
firework displays 2
english state 2
english catholic 2
common prayer 2
church bells 2
children begging 2
century effigies 2
catholic sentiment 2
cathedral close 2
bonfire night 2
5th november 2

ngrams of length 3

collocation frequency
guy fawkes night 20
gunpowder treason day 8
guy fawkes day 7
predominant english state 2
night guy fawkes 2
lit tar barrels 2
fawkes night guy 2
english state commemoration 2
anti catholic sentiment 2
5th november act 2

ngrams of length 4

collocation frequency
predominant english state commemoration 2

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s